Best Smallest ATX Cases of 2024 (Slim & Compact)

I get it:

You’re looking for a small ATX case that still packs a punch – and I’ve got your back.

In this guide, we’re taking a look at the 5 smallest ATX cases in the market right now that are worth every penny.

But if you want us to cut to the chase, I recommend—

  1. Best for Gaming: Thermaltake S200G TG
  2. Premium Design: Fractal Design North
  3. Cheapest Option: GAMDIAS AURA GC1

Now let’s take a look at each of these cases in-depth.

But first:

Quick Tip

Even a small ATX case is large compared to micro ATX and mini ITX cases.

If you’re looking for an even smaller case, check out our complete guide on the smallest micro ATX cases or the smallest ITX cases.

Alright, here are handpicked smallest cases for ATX motherboards in the market:

5 Best Small ATX Case

Don’t be fooled by advertisements and flashy lights. A great case is sturdy, provides good airflow, has a spacious interior, etc.

I tested dozens and dozens of PC cases over 2.5 years based on exactly that. Here are my top 5 ATX cases that are small, compact, and actually functional:

Best with Display
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 17.323" x 8.071" x 15.433"
Popular Pick
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 15.563" x 8.268" x 18.11"
Best under $100
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 325 mm / 12.795"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5"
    • Dimensions: 17.8" x 8.7" x 16.1"
Premium Design
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 300 mm / 11.811" (w Drive Cages) OR 355 mm / 13.976" (w/o Drive Cages)
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 17.598" x 8.465" x 18.465"
Cheap Option
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 260 mm / 10.236"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 13.858" x 7.874" x 17.402"
Best with Display
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 17.323" x 8.071" x 15.433"
Popular Pick
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 15.563" x 8.268" x 18.11"
Best under $100
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 325 mm / 12.795"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5"
  • Dimensions: 17.8" x 8.7" x 16.1"
Premium Design
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 300 mm / 11.811" (w Drive Cages) OR 355 mm / 13.976" (w/o Drive Cages)
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 17.598" x 8.465" x 18.465"
Cheap Option
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 260 mm / 10.236"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 13.858" x 7.874" x 17.402"

Now, let’s discuss each of them in detail and see if it fits your bill:

1. Jonsbo D41: Best for Water Cooling

Have you ever heard of the Pine Cone series, best known for mesh cases and excellent airflow-specific capabilities? This one is a decent option.

Best with Display
JONSBO D41

The compact ATX case features an 8” LCD panel, making it one of a kind. You can view custom animations, temperature, and other details via the interface.

Pros:
  • Space-efficient layout
  • Excellent airflow and water-cooling
  • Perfect for large GPUs — up to 330mm
  • Unique LCD panel
Cons:
  • Limited space for bulkier cables
  • Doesn’t feature a handle
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Based on my detailed tests involving size considerations, compatibility, and more, the Jonsbo D41 is the best smallest ATX PC case if you are prioritizing innovation and compactness. Despite the compactness, it can fit in the likes of NVIDIA 4090 and other high-end graphics cards.

As a passionate gamer, my PC tends to run hot. That is exactly why the cooling setup of this comes in handy. The ATX case has ample space to fit in multiple 120mm or even 140mm fans, either up top or at the bottom. Water cooled-expertise makes it a bang for the buck as you can fit in radiators as big as 360mm.

The D41 is accommodative — making room for three 2.5” SSDs and two HDD cages or 3.5” bays. Then, there are seven PCIe slots catering to every possible high-end GPU that your budget permits.

As for the size, any card up to 330mm can fit in. I tested the same with the Samsung 970 EVO Plus 1 TB NVMe SSD and the Barracuda 2TB HDD and experienced zero implementation issues. I also tried out the 285mm RTX 3080 and could see that there was room left for a bigger card.

Type
ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Great
Window
Yes
Spacious
Average
Noise
No

My hands-on experience with cabling revealed mixed results. While I was happy with the strategic cutouts and a lot of room behind the motherboard tray, there wasn’t much space between the side panels and the motherboard, especially for the thick, bundled cables.

The material quality exceeded expectations though. The steel chassis, followed by the tempered glass-clad side panel, did strike the perfect balance between aesthetics and safety. The case, despite the size limitations, felt premium.

While gaming at high intensity, I didn’t experience a lot of noise. The max noise level, including storage devices and the RTX 3080, went as high as 27.4 dB, which is relatively quiet and comparable to the library whispers.

The case and the components were easy to put together. The design felt tooled, thanks to the ergonomic side panels. What stood out was the adjustable PSU mount. However, new users might have a hard time planning the cable flow.

Also, the compact yet robust layout brings home all the relevant front-facing I/O ports, including one Type-A and one Type-C port.

2. Thermaltake S200G TG: Best for Gaming

Want to build a gaming rig? This RGB case is one of the most loved cases in the community.

Popular Pick
Thermaltake S200 TG

This is a compact yet feature-packed PC case that is good enough for gaming and even doubles down as a slim ATX case.

Pros:
  • Compact yet excellent airflow
  • Can support large GPUs
  • Supports quiet operation
  • Four storage bays
  • Seven full-size expansion slots
Cons:
  • No USB-C in front
  • Radiator placement is limited
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The best part about Thermaltake S200G TG, you ask? Well, let’s start with the airflow. The cooling setup shines, all thanks to the mesh front panel.

The case itself includes support for three 120mm hydraulic bearing fans — ARGB variants, to be exact. You can fit up to six 140mm fans for heavy-duty gaming.

There is support for two SSDs and two hard disk drives with 2.5” and 3.5” slots. I tested the same with the MX500 SSD and a 4TB HDD from Western Digital.

Also, I checked the on-paper offering of 7 PCIe slots with the 242mm RTX 3070 Ti graphics card. Notably, there was a lot of space left for better gaming cards, as big as 330mm.

As a mid-tower ATX, there weren’t any stutters while managing the cables. But then, the bulkier cables were hard sells, much like the Jonsbo D41.

Type
ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Good
Window
Yes
Spacious
Average
Noise
No

The case features tempered glass side panels, each 3mm thick. The chassis is made of steel but is surprisingly light at 4.8 pounds.

When tested under heavy load, with all the components pre-installed, the noise levels peaked at 28 dB, which is impressive enough. As for the dust filters, the S200G TG features the basic ones without the self-cleaning capabilities.

The tool-less side panels are easy to put together. Plus, the 3+ ltr additional volume, compared to the Jonsbo D41, ensures seamless and easy installation.

As for the add-ons, Thermaltake S200G TG packs support for RGB lightning. And while the USB Type-A port makes an appearance, there isn’t an opening for Type-C.

3. Vetroo AL-MESH-7C: Good Airflow

If you want a small form ATX case but this is for your first build, I would suggest going for a compact but roomy case like this.

Best under $100
Vetroo AL-MESH-7C

With support for water cooling, Type-C, and the ability to include high-end graphics cards, this one is an all-inclusive and the smallest full-size ATX case, capable of housing ATX, micro ATX, and Mini ITX motherboards.

Pros:
  • Supports radiators and fans for efficient cooling
  • Customizable RGB lighting
  • Front mounted PSU
Cons:
  • Storage options are restricted
  • Limited colors
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A bigger ATX case, a tad more voluminous compared to the Jonsbo and Thermaltake variants, the Vetroo AL-MESH-7C makes a compelling case.

Cooling gets a front seat in this low profile ATX case as there is support for a 360mm radiator up to, primarily for water cooling. I tested the same with the Corsair H150i Pro RGB cooler and saw that even under heavy load, the temperature levels were low.

There is also support for a 120mm RGB and PWM fan, with a pre-installed option already in play. Enhancing the airflow further are the intuitive mesh panels and room for 140mm fans.

Watch Out

Your case’s airflow is vital to the health of your PC.

Without good airflow, your components may overheat, which can potentially damage or break them altogether.

Rather than crossing your fingers, it’s best to buy a case with good airflow and great cable management options.

All of the cases on this list have proper airflow, but some are better than others.

Read our guide for an in-depth look at cable management and airflow.

Or, if you just want a case that has good cable management, check out our guide on the best cases for cable management.

This case might not come with the 5.25 bay, but it surely makes up for it with two 3.5-inch HDD bays. Additionally, this $80 case can also accommodate high-end graphics cards as big as 325mm. There are seven full-fledged PCIe slots, which I tested with the RTX 3070 Ti graphics card.

As for the designated PSU slot, I tested the Vetroo case with the RM750x module from Corsair. The front I/O panel is equipped with all the necessary ports — two Type-A and one Type-C.

This case brings forth customizable and optional RGB components. And at almost 41 ltr, the size of the internal chassis doesn’t look as restricted as some of the smallest cases for ATX motherboards.

Type
ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Good
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

The case features tempered glass side panels, each 3mm thick. The chassis is made of steel but is surprisingly light at 4.8 pounds.

When tested under heavy load, with all the components pre-installed, the noise levels peaked at 28 dB, which is impressive enough. As for the dust filters, the S200G TG features the basic ones without the self-cleaning capabilities.

The tool-less side panels are easy to put together. Plus, the 3+ ltr additional volume, compared to the Jonsbo D41, ensures seamless and easy installation.

As for the add-ons, Thermaltake S200G TG packs support for RGB lightning. And while the USB Type-A port makes an appearance, there isn’t an opening for Type-C.

4. Fractal Design North: Best for RTX 4080

Want a premium feel? This is easily one of the best-looking PC cases around.

Premium Design
Fractal Design North

The case looks great and is one of the few slim ATX cases to offer fine-patterned mesh for seamless filtering. Plus, it's a great bet for 4080, as tested, and even for 4090, 3080, and every other RTX card in existence.

Pros:
  • Wooden front panel feels premium
  • Ample expansion slots
  • Excellent cooling support
  • Can handle large graphics cards
Cons:
  • Little expensive
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The Fractal Design North is a thin yet compact PC case with wooden accents, the ability to fit in water cooling radiators, and a delivery capacity of over 45 ltrs.

As far as cooling is concerned, you get access to mesh ventilation for optimal airflow. There are two built-in 140mm pulse width modulation fans, followed by the case’s ability to accommodate additional 120mm units.

Plus, Fractal lets you add a 240mm radiator up top and a 360mm radiator in the front part of the case, ensuring the best possible cooling performance under the heaviest of loads.

If you go deeper into the internal layout, you will see that Fractal includes two 2.5” and two 3.5” internal slots for pairing SSDs and HDDs. Plus, there are two external bays as well for enhanced customization.

I tested the setup with the RTX 4080 GPU, which is a 310mm unit and had a lot of spare space to account for. On paper, the Fractal Design North can accommodate cards as big as 355mm without the 360mm radiator. As for the I/O setup, there is one Type-C port followed by mic jacks and two Type-A ports.

The unit has a size of over 45 ltrs, making cabling easy. As there are seven bridgeless PCIe slots, it makes life easier, allowing even the bulkier PSU cables to find space.

Type
ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Great
Window
No
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

Aesthetic-wise, the case is made of steel and alloy with some wooden and plastic accents for that premium feel. You can either opt for the mesh variant or the one with tempered glass, with the latter being 100g heavier.

The noise level at high load, per our tests, never exceeds 28 dB, which is akin to a library setup. Also, this is one of the few cases to have a top, bottom, and even front adhering filters for the best possible cleaning performance.

Assembling this case might take some effort as the design is a tad premium compared to other products on the list.

With the front panels made of oak or walnut, you wouldn’t want to scratch the same. But then, dissembling is easy as the front portion can be unclipped, and the top can be popped off without any tool.

5. GAMDIAS AURA GC1: Best for NAS

Looking for a cheap ATX case? Open to sacrificing the size a bit? This is the one for you!

Cheap Option
GAMDIAS AURA GC1

The case supports tool-free installation, making it one of the best ATX cases for upgrades.

Plus, it is one of the few cases on the list to support RGB-specific customization and system-wide lighting syncs for the more passionate gamer in you.

Pros:
  • Built-in ARGB fans
  • Seamless cable management
  • Features a loaded drive bay setup
Cons:
  • Limited radiator options
  • Lacks the newest I/O ports
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Even though the GAMDIAS AURA GC1 is primarily a gaming-centric PC case, it also makes a strong case for a NAS or network-attached storage — setup, courtesy of the multiple drive bays and an enhanced cooling setup comprising four 120mm fans.

Now that I am already into cooling-based discussions, it makes sense to say that the GC1 case comes pre-installed with three 120mm ARGB fans out in front and one at the back.

Plus, there is enough space for additional fan installations. The front panel is meshed, helping with the airflow.

When it comes to driving bays, the case stands out. There are two internal bays for 2.5” SSD modules, followed by two customizable units for 3.5” HDDs, or one SSD and one HDD cage, based on your requirements. There are seven PCIe slots followed by plenty of I/O options, including the USB 3.0 slot, USB 2.0 module, and other basic units. But then, the lack of Type-C ports can be a dealbreaker for some of you.

Type
ATX
Airflow
Good
Design
Good
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

If you are concerned about cable management, the GC1, all thanks to its sleek layout, puts all your doubts to rest. The fans and the PSU slot are placed strategically, making ample space for even the bulkier cables.

This case is made of ABS and SPCC, lending durability and slimness to the entire layout. It is one of the lightest ATX cases at 4.9 pounds and features a tempered panel.

I tested the case in real-time conditions, with and without a GPU. Even at the heaviest load, the noise levels never exceeded 32 dB. As for filters, the mesh panel doubles down to maintain airflow efficiency. But they do require regular cleaning.

Case Buying Guide

carbide air 540

If you’re interested in building a gaming PC, you must choose the right case. Of course, that’s easier said than done.

To aid those new to building gaming computers, I’ve created this guide to help you understand everything you need to know when it comes to selecting the best ATX case.

So, what’s the deal with ATX, micro-ATX, and mini-ITX?

The names stem from motherboard size categories. Motherboards are grouped into these three categories.

ATX is the largest, micro-ATX is a bit smaller, and mini-ITX is the smallest.

At the moment, full-sized ATX cases are the most popular form factor for a variety of reasons.

  • ATX motherboards are 12 × 9.6 inches (305 × 244 mm).
  • ATX cases are usually also compatible with micro-ATX motherboards, which are 9.6 × 9.6 inches (244 × 244 mm).
  • Lastly, mini-ITX motherboards are 6.7 × 6.7 inches (170 x 170 mm), making them the smallest of the three form factors.

Since cases are responsible for housing motherboards, cases are categorized in the same manner (ATX, micro-ATX, etc.)

It’s always important to ensure that the case you buy is compatible with your motherboard’s form factor.

How to Choose a PC Case?

1. A great PC case is strong. Avoid the ones constructed with flimsy plastic – after all, your case is supposed to protect your parts and keep them from breaking, right?

A few plastic parts here and there are okay and most cases have some plastic. However, ensure the material is of high quality and strong before risking your expensive components.

2. A great gaming case has fantastic airflow. If your case doesn’t have good airflow, your PC could overheat and shut down.

Despite being able to handle high temperatures, your parts can be damaged if they are too hot. Whether you’re using 80mm, 120mm, or 140mm case fans, airflow is incredibly important!

3. A great computer case has room for plenty of quiet case fans! This goes hand-in-hand with airflow. If your case doesn’t have space to add case fans, it’s a no-go.

Thermaltake Core G3

Most gaming cases ship have fans included – many of them have cool-looking LEDs too.

But before you’re fooled by fancy lights, it’s important to make sure your fans are quiet.

Noisy fans can be especially annoying if you’re sensitive to noise.

4. A great case has enough room for your components! This may seem obvious, but some cases don’t have enough room for CPU coolers and graphics cards.

For example, the first time I built a gaming PC, the hard drive bays in my case got in the way of my graphics card!

So go for looks and esthetics by all means, but don’t sacrifice the breather just for the sake of showing off your smallest ATX case!

5. A great case has good cable management options. This means there is plenty of space for your cables, and they can be run throughout the case in a neat and orderly fashion.

Instead of bundling them up inside the case – which is both ugly and bad for airflow – you can run your cables in the back.

This keeps your case looking clean and promotes good airflow.

Before you pull the trigger on the case of your dreams, make sure that:

  • Your graphics card will fit inside the case
  • Your CPU cooler will fit inside the case
  • Your case has enough hard drive bays

Otherwise, you’ll be quite disappointed!

Do You Need a ‘Gaming’ Case?

Many companies advertise their cases as “gaming cases”. Just because a case is outfitted with cool LED lights does not necessarily make it a gaming case.

Most uneducated PC builders will buy a case simply for its looks, without really considering the factors mentioned above.

It is more important to find a functional case that provides good airflow and cable management. A good case must also be sturdy and cost-effective.

Sure, a good-looking case is always nice, but it is not necessary. If you’re on a budget, especially a budget below $500, don’t spend more than $80 on your case.

In fact, I’d recommend spending $60 or less. For more information on choosing the best case for your PC, check out my complete guide.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Here are some of the most common questions I get asked about the smallest ATX cases:

Cat ATX fit micro ATX cases?

Yes, ATX cases are designed to be ‘backwards compatible’ with micro ATX motherboards. Micro ATX motherboards use the same mounting standoff locations as ATX, minus a few of them (since it’s smaller). Generally, an ATX case can fit a micro ATX motherboard, but not the other way around.

What does ATX mean?

ATX stands for Advanced Technology eXtended. The motherboard/power supply configuration was developed by Intel in 1995 and has become one of the most popular PC form factors since.

Is ATX better than Micro ATX?

Micro ATX cases blend the small form factor of ITX cases with the functionality of ATX boards. If you want to run a powerful PC in a decent-sized case that’s still small enough for your desk and portable, a micro ATX case is definitely a good choice.

How many case fans do I need?

The number of case fans depends on how hot your system will be. If you plan on running your components with stock frequencies, you can probably get away with a few. However heavy overclocking will require more than just a few, configured in an optimal layout.

Review Summary

The case’s form factor isn’t for everyone, but for those looking for a small ATX case, the Jonsbo D41 or Thermaltake S200G is great.

Here’s a quick run back for you:

Best with Display
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 17.323" x 8.071" x 15.433"
Popular Pick
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 15.563" x 8.268" x 18.11"
Best under $100
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 325 mm / 12.795"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5"
    • Dimensions: 17.8" x 8.7" x 16.1"
Premium Design
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 300 mm / 11.811" (w Drive Cages) OR 355 mm / 13.976" (w/o Drive Cages)
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 17.598" x 8.465" x 18.465"
Cheap Option
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 260 mm / 10.236"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 13.858" x 7.874" x 17.402"
Best with Display
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 17.323" x 8.071" x 15.433"
Popular Pick
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 15.563" x 8.268" x 18.11"
Best under $100
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 325 mm / 12.795"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5"
  • Dimensions: 17.8" x 8.7" x 16.1"
Premium Design
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 300 mm / 11.811" (w Drive Cages) OR 355 mm / 13.976" (w/o Drive Cages)
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 17.598" x 8.465" x 18.465"
Cheap Option
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 260 mm / 10.236"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 13.858" x 7.874" x 17.402"

At the end of the day, your PC build comes down to your budget, your personal preferences, and what you’re looking to do with your PC.

author avatar
Jacob Tuwiner Founder
Jacob transforms PC building from daunting to doable. With 8+ years in gaming rigs and tech advice, he's your go-to-guy for uncomplicated, savvy PC insights.