7 Smallest Micro ATX Cases in 2024 (Tried & Tested)

Here’s the deal:

You are about balance. Balance between cool looks and functionality. Balance between performance and budget.

But here’s the thing: You need balance with compactness!

And you know that while this balancing act looks simple on the surface, it takes more time, energy, and credit card limit to bring everything together.

That’s exactly where PC builders like me come into the picture. I’ve tested and built dozens of custom builds (yes, cases included)

I’ve rounded up the best (and the smallest) micro ATX cases in the market today. Here are quick picks:

  1. Smallest mATX case: Jonsbo D31 Mesh SC
  2. Budget Pick: CoolerMaster Q300L V2
  3. Best for NAS: Thermaltake Core V21

Smallest Micro ATX Cases

In this section, I go a bit more in-depth. I’ll be taking a closer look at 7 cases, talking about the pros and cons of each one, any notable features, the design, and why I decided to include the case in this list.

But first, here’s a quick overview of each case on the list:

Best Overall
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
    • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 7.323" x 8.071" x 13.681"
Most Stylish Case
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 15.846" x 8.268" x 15.748"
Value for Money
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 338 mm / 13.307"
    • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 13.78" x 8.071" x 18.11"
Budget Pick
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 360 mm / 14.173"
    • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 15.236" x 9.055" x 15.079"
Best Airflow
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 320 mm / 12.598"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 16.26" x 8.465" x 16.969"
Best for Storage
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
    • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 16.693" x 12.598" x 13.228"
Best under $50
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 275 mm / 10.827"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 7.87" x 13.82" x 15.35"
Best Overall
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
  • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 7.323" x 8.071" x 13.681"
Most Stylish Case
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 15.846" x 8.268" x 15.748"
Value for Money
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 338 mm / 13.307"
  • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 13.78" x 8.071" x 18.11"
Budget Pick
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 360 mm / 14.173"
  • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 15.236" x 9.055" x 15.079"
Best Airflow
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 320 mm / 12.598"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 16.26" x 8.465" x 16.969"
Best for Storage
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
  • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 16.693" x 12.598" x 13.228"
Best under $50
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 275 mm / 10.827"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 7.87" x 13.82" x 15.35"

Okay so now get ready for the case reviews and choose the perfect one for your next build:

Quick Tip

Small form factor micro ATX cases are awesome, but they are more difficult to use than traditional ATX cases that have more space.

If you’re new to building, using an ATX case is probably a better option.

In addition, ATX motherboards usually have more features, and won’t fit in your micro-ATX case.

You can check out our guide on the smallest ATX cases here. They support full-size motherboards but aren’t too big and bulky.

1. Jonsbo D31: Best for Home Server

This is the smallest micro ATX case on the list and has an 8” HD display on the front. It looks cool and it will turn heads, and that’s honestly enough reason for me to geek out over it.

Best Overall
JONSBO D31
$144.99

Given the 33-liter volume and tool-less design, installing components was quick and easy. I just wish the panels were built better with tighter tolerances.

Pros:
  • LCD display
  • Roomy
Cons:
  • Build quality
Check Price on Amazon
02/18/2024 09:54 am GMT

This Jonsbo D31 Mesh SC is the kind of case you won’t know you’ll want until you’ve seen it. Coming from a mini ITX case, the mATX case is a significant upgrade for me.

It’s large and roomy, and while no fans are included, you can install up to eight 120 mm fans in various configurations. I’d recommend getting at least two fans as the interior can heat up rather quickly.

The case supports only one 3.5” drive and two 2.5” drives, which I think is a bit low given that smaller mini ITX cases often support more expansion.

That said, the GPU slot is much roomier and you can fit a 200 mm ATX power supply in here quite comfortably. Front I/O includes a USB-C and a USB-A port.

My RTX 4090 and Core i9 14900K fit quite comfortably, though I will add that my 360 mm cooler forced the PSU down a bit, eating into the GPU space. With 33 liters to play around with and plenty of cable routing channels and mount points, cable management wasn’t much of a challenge.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Good
Design
Average
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

It’s a USB-powered, mini HDMI display that mounts on the front panel. You route the cables through the chassis and then out the back, where they’re then inserted into the motherboard I/O panel and GPU. Not an optimal solution, but it gets the job done.

There’s a dust panel covering the bottom inlet, which is fine if you’re going for a positive pressure build. Since there are no fans, be sure to get silent ones if you want a quiet case.

The only disappointment was build quality. The plates and panels are made of steel, but quite thin, and the powder coating isn’t very even either. That 8” display, though, more than makes up for any shortcomings!

On the plus side, the display is a legitimate computer monitor and you can do whatever you like with it. I set it up with an AIDA64 panel to keep track of PC stats, but you can customize it however you like.

2. Lian Li Lancool 205M: Best under $100

The Micro ATX RGB case is a simple and stylish option if you are planning a clean build.

Most Stylish Case
LIAN LI Lancool 205M
$89.99

With plenty of expansion and sensible cable management at a reasonable price, this case is a great all-rounder, especially if you’re planning a NAS.

Pros:
  • Clean build
  • Excellent cable management
  • Good value for money
Cons:
  • Needs more fans for hotter builds
  • No front USB-C port
Check Price on Amazon
02/18/2024 10:13 am GMT

I ordered the 205M Mesh variant of the 205 series because it came with dual 140 mm ARGB fans on the front. Together with the dual 120 mm fans from my 240 mm radiator, the case maintained low temperatures throughout my testing. This was on an all-AMD NAS build featuring a 7700X CPU and 7600XT GPU.

The GPU has plenty of room to breath and I had no trouble installing it, and this is aided by the fact that there’s a PSU shroud at the bottom.

I populated both 3.5” bays with 16 TB EXOS drives for my NAS setup, and installed a couple of SSDs for the OS and cache. If you drop one 3.5” drive, you can add another 2.5” SSD to the setup.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Great
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

There’s no USB-C on the front, but you do get two USB-A ports as well as 3.5mm audio jacks.

Cable management was a breeze thanks to adequate routing options and several grommets, giving me plenty of room to hide cables behind the motherboard panels. The result was quite a clean build and I was surprised at how easy it was to put everything together in this small case for micro ATX.

Built from steel, the case is light and sturdy with the parts having a good fit and finish. I think the case is aesthetically unremarkable, but the ARGB fans on the front do add a touch of flair.

The included fans have Lian Li branding, and given their size, run quietly with good airflow. I like positive pressure setups and my components don’t run very hot, but if you do use hotter components like a Core i9-4090 combo, you’re going to need some more fans.

That aside, the tool-less design and large thumbscrews allow the side panels to pop off quite easily, leaving plenty of breathing room when assembling the PC—a feature I really liked.

3. ASUS Prime AP201: Best for Water Cooling

This compact mATX case from Asus comes with quasi-filter mesh panels—a fresh breath of air for both you and the components.

Value for Money
ASUS Prime AP201

This 33-litre case is a great option for a tiny workstation or heavy-duty gaming rig thanks to its extensive cooling support. There’s also plenty of room for expanding storage and even for additional expansion cards.

Pros:
  • Excellent airflow
  • 10 Gbps USB-C
Cons:
  • Single dust filter
  • Cable management
Check Price on Amazon

The ASUS Prime AP201 supports large, 360 mm AiOs and even 170 mm tall CPU coolers like the monster Noctua NH-D15S I used to cool my Intel Core i7-13700K. The GPU – a triple-fan 4070 Ti – fit comfortably as well, and the system did not overheat and throttle.

There’s only one 120 mm fan installed by default, though, so be careful with how you orient your CPU cooler. I’d also recommend more fans if you’re going with an air-cooling setup like I am.

Up to three HDDs and SSDs can be mounted on the bottom panel, with room for one on the front panel under the PSU.

An additional 2.5” SSD can be mounted on the rear of the motherboard panel as well. I opted for a 3.5” drive on the bottom panel with a 120 mm fan beside it to help with cooling, and a 2.5” drive on the back of the motherboard.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Good
Design
Good
Window
No
Spacious
Yes
Noise
Average

Front I/O includes a 10 Gbps USB-C port, which is very handy when moving large amounts of data. It’s nice to have two USB-A ports as well for additional peripherals.

Cable management is the one area I have a few complaints about. While ASUS has provided plenty of straps and grommets for managing cables, there’s limited room behind and under the motherboard, and I had a tough time packing the excess cables from my S12D 750, which is not a modular power supply.

Overall build quality, though, is quite good. The powder-coated steel mesh panels cover all sides, including the top and bottom, and the interiors are very sturdy. That said, my PC did get quite dusty after a few weeks of use because ASUS has only included one dust filter.

The panels and most of the interior mounting are tool-less so installation wasn’t a problem. As mentioned earlier, the only real issue was finding room to pack in excess cabling from the PSU.

4. CoolerMaster Q300L V2: Best for Cable Management

Given that the original was so popular because of its pricing, though, I think you could choose either depending on how much you like the new design.

Budget Pick
Cooler Master Q300L V2

Cable management and build quality is as good as it was in the original. There’s plenty of space for routing cables and the steel body holds up well for the price.

Where the V1 had an acrylic side panel, the new one has a tempered glass panel.

Pros:
  • Tempered glass side panel
  • 20 Gbps USB-C
  • Roomy cabinet
Cons:
  • Airflow is still a problem
  • Not much of an upgrade
Check Price on Amazon

As a more expensive and extremely popular successor to the original — Q300Lthe Version 2 of this chassis has a lot to live up to.

To be fair, it largely succeeds in justifying the price increase by offering a slight redesign, a tempered glass side panel, and faster I/O, but it also carries forward some of the drawbacks of the original design.

Cooling is the area where I expected to see the biggest improvements, but sadly, there are none. You’re still only getting a single 120 mm fan as exhaust, the mount points for the fan are still rough, and the top 120 mm fan still interferes with EPS connectors and large air coolers.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Average
Design
Great
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
Yes

The bigger problem is that the front mesh still impedes airflow, and the redesign of the front panel is cosmetic.

Since I didn’t have high hopes for cooling, and given the budget the case is targeting, I opted for a mid-range build with an Intel Core i5-14600K CPU and AMD 7700XT GPU with a CoolerMaster 212 tower cooler.

As expected, temperatures were high, but at least the CPU and GPU didn’t overheat and slow down. This performance isn’t much different from that of the original Q300L.

The internal layout is largely the same, with similar support for a single 3.5” drive, dual 2.5” SSDs, and four PCIe expansion slots. Front I/O does get a significant upgrade in the form of a 20 Gbps USB-C port. Oh, and the I/O panel is now at the top of the case.

However, I did find it perfect for budget builds and people who want a different look from the predecessor.

5. DeepCool CH370: Best for Airflow

This is another cheap and small case at a great price and I’d strongly recommend it to anyone looking for a compact, high-airflow micro ATX for gaming or workstation use.

Compact Case
DeepCool CH370

This micro ATX mid-tower comes with a simple, yet brilliant chassis featuring plenty of airflow, dust filters at every inlet, and thoughtful touches like a GPU anti-sag bracket and retractable headphone holder.

Pros:
  • Excellent value
  • Great airflow
  • Dust filters everywhere
Cons:
  • No rubber grommets
  • No USB-C
Check Price on Amazon

Honestly, my favorite micro ATX case is the DeepCool CH370. DeepCool is a relatively new company in the enthusiast market but has built a solid reputation for itself thanks to excellent engineering and thoughtful design.

Starting with cooling, we see that the mATX case supports a 360 mm radiator and – including radiator fans – a total of eight 120 mm fans. You can swap out five of these for four 140 mm versions if you prefer.

I especially like the fact that the PSU shroud is perforated and can accommodate two 120 mm fans for cooling the GPU. The PSU area itself has additional inlets with dust filters. This is not something I often see in cases and is a feature I really appreciate.

You’ll need to add additional fans yourself of course, but I think that’s fine given the cost of the case.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Great
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

As for the rest, there’s space for two 3.5” drives and three 2.5” drives, 165 mm clearance for a CPU cooler, and room for 320 mm GPUs.

GPU clearance can be an issue for exceptionally large cards, but most cards – even a 4090 – could be installed with ease. My Sapphire Nitro+ 7900XTX, for example, easily fits inside of this case.

Owing to the great airflow, I didn’t hesitate to install a 14900K and 360 mm radiator in this build. Temperatures rarely exceeded 70 even under load and because I opted for silent Noctua fans, fan noise was very controlled. Installing these components wasn’t difficult as the panels can all be removed for easier access.

This is a relatively cheap case and some compromises had to be made, but I don’t think any were made in areas that really matter.

6. Thermaltake Core V21: Best for NAS Build

Working with the case is easy as Thermaltake has designed a great deal of flexibility into the case itself.

Best for Storage
Thermaltake Core V21 SPCC

It is one of the most flexible cases you can buy today. V21 uses a cube design. It’s also large and roomy and perfect for builds featuring large components.

Pros:
  • Large and roomy
  • 200 mm RGB intake fan
  • Excellent mounting flexibility
Cons:
  • Can be too large for some
  • No USB-C
Check Price on Amazon

The feature I love the most about the Thermaltake Core V21 SPCC is the ample room for storage. You can fit up to 6 drives in this chassis, three of which can be 3.5” HDDs.

I populated two slots with a RAID 1 array of HDDs for backup and added two additional SSDs for managing my game library.

Cooling is very well handled thanks to a massive 200 mm RGB fan on the front and room for up to 9 additional fans on the top, rear, and side panels. I kept the build simple and only installed an exhaust fan on the rear panel, which proved more than sufficient for my air-cooled 7800X3D and RTX 4080 GPU.

Front I/O is a standard dual USB-A + dual 3.5 mm layout though. I’d have liked to see at least one USB-C port.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Great
Design
Great
Window
Yes
Spacious
Yes
Noise
No

The case is made from a cold-rolled steel plate and feels sturdy. All the panels pop off quite easily and can be swapped around. Since I was using a powerful GPU, I mounted a mesh panel on the side and placed the acrylic panel on top so I’d have a nice view of the RGB-lit interior.

Thanks to that large, slow 200 mm fan on the front, you can barely hear the fans when the PC is on. The massive front inlet also creates a positive pressure environment, which I prefer for mitigating dust build-up.

Fan rails can be individually removed and repositioned to aid in the installation of fans and coolers, as can most of the internal trays and compartments. I also found plenty of room and mount points for zip ties to ease cable management.

7. Antec NX200M: Cheap Option

I’d spend more if I wanted some bling, but given the price (mostly on sale) I’m quite happy with what’s on offer.

Best under $50
Antec NX200 M

This is an uncomplicated case that offers great value. It’s roomy enough for a mid-range PC build, comes with adequate cooling potential, and looks great on a desk.

Pros:
  • Excellent value when discounted
  • Compact build
Cons:
  • Limited GPU space
  • USB 2.0 on the front
Check Price on Amazon

Airflow is surprisingly great for the price this Antec NX200M comes at.

I mounted a 240 mm radiator on the front of the case and didn’t add any additional fans. Antec includes a 120 mm rear exhaust fan, and together with the 2x 120 mm fans on my radiator, I feel the cooling was enough for my 13600K.

I do wish Antec hadn’t blocked the front panel with a thick mesh, though, as it seems to impede airflow.

Since it’s sort of a tiny case, storage is limited. You can install three drives – 2x 3.5” bays are available. Since this was meant to work as a living-room PC, I prioritized silence and speed and went with an all-SSD build.

Be warned, front I/O is disappointing. While you get three USB-A ports, only one of them is rated for USB 3.0.

This is fine if you have a couple of dongles to attach, but a problem when, like me, you transfer a lot of data in and out of the system.

Type
Micro ATX
Airflow
Average
Design
Good
Window
Yes
Spacious
Average
Noise
No

The case is made from a cold-rolled steel plate and feels sturdy. All the panels pop off quite easily and can be swapped around. Since I was using a powerful GPU, I mounted a mesh panel on the side and placed the acrylic panel on top so I’d have a nice view of the RGB-lit interior.

Thanks to that large, slow 200 mm fan on the front, you can barely hear the fans when the PC is on. The massive front inlet also creates a positive pressure environment, which I prefer for mitigating dust build-up.

Fan rails can be individually removed and repositioned to aid in the installation of fans and coolers, as can most of the internal trays and compartments. I also found plenty of room and mount points for zip ties to ease cable management.

mATX Case Buying Guide

smallest matx case

Buying a mATX case for your next gaming PC is definitely a move.

You can find both high-end and budget micro ATX cases, so they can be used in builds ranging from $600 up to $1000+.

Before you buy yourself any Micro ATX case – let alone a small or slim Micro ATX case – you should always ponder exactly what you’re looking for.

It’s important to consider the following:

  • Desk space
  • Front USB
  • Expansion support
  • Building difficulty
  • Airflow
  • Storage options
  • Serviceability
  • Graphics card support

Desk Space

Always consider how much desk space your case will take up since it’s ultimately the shell of your system. If you have a small desk or several monitors, maybe consider a slimmer option or an alternate case placement.

Front USB

If you plan on plugging in USB flash drives consistently without having to pull a reach around you might want to go for an option that includes USB 3.0 with the front panel IO.

Expansion Support

Depending on what type of graphics card you use it may take up two or more slots and you might even want other expansion cards, so make sure you always check the case’s expansion options.

Building Difficulty

If you’re new to building computers or maybe just rusty you may want to find a case that’s much easier to build in so that you can swiftly get your new computer up and running ASAP.

Airflow

Airflow may not seem as important in a smaller case since smaller form factor builds don’t usually produce as much heat as more beefy ones. We cannot stress enough how important it is to keep your parts cool to get the best performance and longevity out of your components.

Watch Out

Your case’s airflow is vital to the health of your PC.

Without good airflow, your components may overheat, which can potentially damage or break them altogether.

Rather than crossing your fingers, it’s best to buy a case with good airflow and great cable management options.

All of the cases on this list have good airflow, but some are better than others.

For an in-depth look at cable management and airflow, check out our guide.

Or, if you just want a case that has good cable management, check out our guide on the best cases for cable management.

Storage Options

small matx case example

If you plan on keeping your case for a very long period (in the tech world that could be quite a few years) you should always look at storage slots and ease of upgrade. Storage runs out quickly and it’s always good to have a little extra for backups. That’s why getting a case with plenty of hard drive storage is important. Click this link to check out our guide on the best PC cases for hard drive storage.

Serviceability

Things break, it’s inevitable, but where will you be when the fortress falls? Choosing a case that offers a warranty is very important. Shipping services don’t exactly care for your well-being, and sometimes the deeper damage isn’t obvious until much longer down the line.

Graphics Card Support

Planning on building a low-profile ultimate gaming rig? Think again. Small form factor cases rarely support anything more than half-height graphics cards, and the highest-end half-height cards are GTX 1050 and 750 ti.

In the end, your case is your choice.

Go for what you want and show off your style in whichever way you decide and game, create content, render, etc. all in your way. The case isn’t just a shell, it’s the ornate mask of your machine.

Whatever you choose, however you choose, just consider our tips and find the case that fits perfectly with your personal preferences, and overall just enjoy your handy work!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

I decided to answer my most commonly asked questions about this topic below:

What Does ATX Stand For?

ATX stands for Advanced Technology eXtended. It’s a spec for motherboards and power supplies in desktops, setting the standard for size, connectors, and power.

What is the smallest micro ATX case?

The Jonsbo D311 is the best and the smallest micro ATX case on the market. It’s small, and compact, yet easy to use, and boasts terrific performance despite its small form factor.

How big is a micro ATX case?

Micro ATX boards measure up to 9.6 by 9.6 inches (but they’re sometimes smaller.)

Is mini or micro ATX smaller?

Mini ITX cases are smaller than micro ATX cases.

Is micro ATX worth it?

Yes, micro ATX is worth it for most people. If you’re looking for a case small enough to fit on your desk and light enough to carry with you (without sacrificing performance) then micro ATX is the move.

What is the Difference Between ATX and Micro ATX?

The main difference between ATX and Micro ATX is the size.

There are three main case sizes: ATX, Micro ATX, and Mini ITX.

ATX cases are the largest, followed by Micro ATX and Mini ITX, respectively.

If you’re looking for a small ATX case, we happen to have a guide about that, and a guide about the smallest Mini-ITX cases too!

However, ATX cases and motherboards tend to be more expensive, as they’re larger and usually have more features.

Is ATX or Micro ATX Better?

The answer to this question is a matter of personal preference, for the most part.

Micro ATX cases are great for those who want their PC to have a low profile.

It’s important to note, though, that some micro ATX cases aren’t large enough for everyone.

For example, you probably won’t be able to fit a water cooling system, a ton of case fans, several hard drives, and multiple GPUs in a micro ATX case.

In that case, you’ll want to go with an ATX mid-tower or even a full-tower.

Nevertheless, micro ATX is still suitable for most people and builds.

Even micro ATX cases these days have pretty spacious interiors, large enough to accommodate most PC builds.

Review Summary

Building a budget PC – whether it’s for gaming or workstation tasks – is an art form.

Just like you choose components based on your performance requirements, you should choose a case based on your style.

Still, there’s more to a case than just its looks.

A micro ATX case should have enough space for your components, cables, and airflow. Here are my picks based on exactly that:

Best Overall
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
    • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 7.323" x 8.071" x 13.681"
Most Stylish Case
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 15.846" x 8.268" x 15.748"
Value for Money
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 338 mm / 13.307"
    • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 13.78" x 8.071" x 18.11"
Budget Pick
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 360 mm / 14.173"
    • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 15.236" x 9.055" x 15.079"
Best Airflow
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 320 mm / 12.598"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 16.26" x 8.465" x 16.969"
Best for Storage
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
    • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 16.693" x 12.598" x 13.228"
Best under $50
    • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
    • Max Video Card Length: 275 mm / 10.827"
    • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
    • Dimensions: 7.87" x 13.82" x 15.35"
Best Overall
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 330 mm / 12.992"
  • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 7.323" x 8.071" x 13.681"
Most Stylish Case
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 15.846" x 8.268" x 15.748"
Value for Money
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 338 mm / 13.307"
  • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 13.78" x 8.071" x 18.11"
Budget Pick
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 Type-C + USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 360 mm / 14.173"
  • Drive Bays: 1 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 15.236" x 9.055" x 15.079"
Best Airflow
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 320 mm / 12.598"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 2 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 16.26" x 8.465" x 16.969"
Best for Storage
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 350 mm / 13.78"
  • Drive Bays: 3 x Internal 3.5" + 3 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 16.693" x 12.598" x 13.228"
Best under $50
  • Front Panel USB: USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A + USB 2.0 Type-A
  • Max Video Card Length: 275 mm / 10.827"
  • Drive Bays: 2 x Internal 3.5" + 1 x Internal 2.5"
  • Dimensions: 7.87" x 13.82" x 15.35"

Go for the one that best suits your use case and budget.

author avatar
Jacob Tuwiner Founder
Jacob transforms PC building from daunting to doable. With 8+ years in gaming rigs and tech advice, he's your go-to-guy for uncomplicated, savvy PC insights.